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30 August 12:30 pm

It seems like only yesterday that we faced Portland Timbers, and indeed, it sort of was. Or last week, but that's somewhat like yesterday.

Timbers have assumed relatively the same approach match-by-match, and that they do is a testament to Caleb Porter's belief in tactical consistency. By and large, that's a belief shared by Jason Kreis, who has been one of the most consistent coaches in MLS in recent memory. But Jason Kreis has this season showed a newfound tactical flexibility without sacrificing that belief, and he's changed the shape with relative frequency. The beauty, though, is that no matter how he's changed the shape, the approach and philosophy has remained the same.

With that in mind, Jason Kreis could deploy his side with a different shape to make more difficult the jobs of Porter and crew.

4-2-1-3: Rimando; Beltran, Borchers, Salcedo, Wingert; Beckerman, Grabavoy; Morales; Plata, Saborio, Findley

Good: In this shape, we'd see Plata and Findley tasked with keeping busy Portland's fullbacks, Harrington and Powell, on the left and the right, respectively. Those two generally are important players, as Porter is well aware of the same thing as Kreis: To succeed in an attacking system with no focus on long ball antics, getting one or even both full backs involved in the attack is essential. By pushing back on those two, a big part of the Portland attack is mitigated.

Bad: We lose something in midfield pressure, leaving Grabavoy and Beckerman to carry more of the pressing weight than they otherwise would. If Portland plays a packed midfield, there's a risk this could get overrun.

4-3-2-1: Rimando, Beltran, Borchers, Salcedo, Wingert; Beckerman, Grabavoy, Grossman; Gil, Morales; Saborio

Good: Here, we have introduced an additional midfielder to the mix. I've pointed to Cole Grossman as the option, because we have here three midfielders involved in defending. This would mitigate any risk of the midfield being overrun. Gil and Morales would both play in a wider arrangement, and perhaps Grabavoy would step further forward to fill in the gaps. Saborio is left as the sole striker, largely to play the midfield into the attack, which would be essential.

Bad: We lose a wide man in attack, which has been important for us. When we have a striker on the wing, we introduce a more dynamic attacking option that forces the defense to rethink their plans. Against an attacking Portland Timbers side, there should be space there — it would be good for us to take advantage of that.

4-4-2: Rimando, Beltran, Borchers, Salcedo, Wingert; Beckerman, Grabavoy, Gil, Morales; Plata, Findley

Good: Rather than taking the hold-up approach with Saborio, which brings us plenty of joy, we could give him a rest and allow him an opportunity off the bench, leaving Plata and Findley as the starting strikers. Those two would be tasked with both going wide, leaving the center for the midfield to run into — perhaps they'd start in a central position and move wide. It's difficult to say. This would give us plenty of attacking width and would surely be strong in transition.

Bad: Well, we'd lack a player to hold up the ball, which we've done before. If, as I picture it, we push Plata and Findley into wide positions, we'd be found sorely lacking in the middle, too, I'm afraid. In essence, it could end up looking like a poor parody of a strikerless system. 

regular contributor to RealSaltLake.com, Matt Montgomery runs the SB Nation blog RSL Soapbox. Follow Matt on Twitter @TheCrossbarRSL

30 August 11:15 am

MLSsoccer.com's Matt Doyle and Dan Haiek took a look at tonight's RSL-Portland matchup on their always interesting feature, The Scouting Report. Give it a watch above. 

28 August 5:03 pm

Real Salt Lake will take on the Portland Timbers for the third time in 24 days on Friday, when it will host the Cascadia club in a nationally-televised match at 8:00 p.m. at Rio Tinto Stadium. 

RSL is unbeaten against Portland this year, beating the Timbers 2-1 in a Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup Semifinal at Rio Tinto Stadium on Aug. 7 before scoring a 93rd minute goal to tie 3-3 at Portland on Aug. 21. 

Highlights from both of those matches are above. Check them out.

28 August 11:24 am

As the MLS season enters the homestretch, it's time to start thinking about end-of-season awards. Much of the soccer media has been talking about this pretty much since the beginning, but the discussion is largely academic until the end is in sight. To Real Salt Lake fans, one of the most compelling awards this year is Coach of the Year, given that Jason Kreis is probably among the few in serious consideration. Kreis' resume in 2013 is impressive - top of the league table, U.S. Open Cup finalist, and most goals scored in franchise history, just to name a few. RSL's play this season has many talking about this possibly being the best RSL team ever, despite trading away three All-Stars in the offseason. Clearly, this season has shown Kreis' true ability as a head coach.

But what are his chances of actually winning the coveted award? It's an uphill battle for recognition for coaches in small markets like Salt Lake, but what Kreis has done this year can't be ignored by even the biggest-market pundits. Now, before we can answer the question, let's take a brief look at the other coaches who I think should be finalists for Coach of the Year.

Marco Schallibaum - Montreal Impact

Some foreign coaches have trouble adapting to the nuances of life in MLS and never really get the hang of it. Marco Schallibaum is not one of those coaches. This is Schallibaum's first season in MLS after a long career coaching around Europe, and he has wasted no time making Montreal one of the league's elite teams. A largely-overlooked squad with a largely-overlooked roster, Montreal is now best in the league in points per game (1.71). They will likely finish No. 1 in the Eastern Conference playoff race, while just a year ago they were seventh. Credit goes to Schallibaum for the renaissance of Marco Di Vaio and for getting Montreal playing as a true team.

Oscar Pareja - Colorado Rapids 

As lovers of RSL it's hard to admit it when the Rapids do something well, but Oscar Pareja was a great hire. After a seventh-place finish in the Western Conference last year, Pareja gambled big by trading away both his starting strikers Omar Cummings and Conor Casey. What he got was a more balanced team that's now in the thick of the Supporter's Shield race. He's getting out-of-this-world play from his bench (goalkeeper Clint Irwin, anyone?), and had maybe the best 2013 draft class of anyone. What team wouldn't want Deshorn Brown and Dillon Powers right now? Like Jason Kreis, Pareja got it done during the offseason and is continuing to do so on the sidelines this regular season. 

Caleb Porter - Portland Timbers 

Caleb Porter is another rookie MLS coach who has made an immediate and unmistakeably positive difference to his squad. The Timbers were one of the worst teams in MLS in 2012, and just a year later they are one of the best. Porter came in from the college ranks with Akron and immediate pushed Portland into a possession style of play similar to the one Real Salt Lake plays. Ever a student of the game, Porter has become one of the better tacticians in the league, but perhaps his greatest accomplishment to date is getting the locker room to believe. Oh, and the offseason acquisitions of guys like Will Johnson and Diego Valeri weren't too bad either.

So is Jason Kreis going to win Coach of the Year when up against these three? It may come down to hardware. If RSL is able to win the Open Cup, that may vault him into the lead. If he can also win the Supporter's Shield, I would say he is pretty much a lock. Winning two major trophies with so many new faces, and doing it in a year that many thought would see RSL struggle, would be unprecedented and cement Kreis' legacy as one of the best to ever coach in this league.

27 August 2:55 pm

Real Salt Lake midfielder Sebastian Velasquez recently participated in an education related PSA for Voices for Utah Children, an organization that advocates for the well-being of children throughout the Beehive State.

Velasquez's PSA deals specifically with school attendance. Give it a watch above and look for it on TV. 

27 August 1:10 pm

The latest video in the Soccer Smarts with Professor Leo series takes a look at Real Salt Lake's forwards. Give it a watch above to learn a little bit about each of the Claret-and-Cobalt's striking group of attackers.=

27 August 9:45 am

Fun video from the guys at ABC 4's Real Sports Live featuring RSL color commentator Brian Dunseth challenging - and, shockingly, beating - Claret-and-Cobalt midfielder Javier Morales in a crossbar challenge.

Javi and Dunny also talk about some of the bigger moments in Javi's Real Salt Lake career, including his first meeting with RSL Head Coach Jason Kreis and the 2011 tackle that sidelined him for nearly five months.

26 August 3:57 pm

Real Salt Lake put the hurt on Columbus on Saturday night, scoring three second half goals to beat the Crew 4-0 at Rio Tinto Stadium.

Here are a few interesting numbers from Saturday’s contest:

48

Real Salt Lake’s four goals on Saturday night gave the team 48 regular season goals this year, breaking the club record of 46 regular season goals set in 2012. The Claret-and-Cobalt still has seven regular season matches remaining this year – plenty of time to add to its new record.

April 12, 2008

Real Salt Lake Captain Kyle Beckerman’s two-goal performance on Saturday night was his first multi-goal game since he bagged two goals against D.C. United on April 12, 2008. Beckerman’s brace was the 45th multi-goal game by a RSL player in club history. The Claret-and-Cobalt is now 37-4-4 all-time when a player scores multiple goals in a match.

107

RSL goalkeeper Nick Rimando earned his 107th career regular season shutout on Saturday night. Rimando is now just five clean-sheets shy of tying Kevin Hartman for the all-time MLS shutout record. The veteran ‘keeper has eight shutouts this year; 71 of his 107 career regular season clean-sheets have come in a RSL uniform.

3

Rimando also moved into third-place in MLS history in minutes played on Saturday night. The “Wall of the Wasatch” has now played 30,753 minutes in 340 career regular season matches, all of which have been starts. He trails only Hartman (37,260) and the retired Steve Ralston (33,142) on the all-time MLS minutes played chart. Rimando is now tied for fifth on the all-time MLS appearances list with former D.C. man Jaime Moreno and is one start away from moving into a tie for third-place on the all-time starts list with Vancouver goalie Joe Cannon.

9

Real Salt Lake has now scored nine goals in its last three games in league action. That’s an absurd total – one that’s good for an average of three goals per game.

26 August 1:38 pm

A 4-0 win over Columbus Crew for Real Salt Lake will surely have everyone in good spirits, and with good reason: Never did RSL look like anything other than the far better side. There is no exaggeration when Jason Kreis called it his side's "most complete performance" of the year.

Mitigating threats

Columbus's biggest threats on the night were surely Dominic Oduro and Federico Higuain. Neither were particularly threatening to RSL's dominance on the night, with Higuain's impact frustrated to the point that he opted to get sent off instead of continuing in the match. Throughout, Columbus Crew took only a single on-target shot and but three off-target shots. There will be plenty of talk about the attack, and rightly so, but just as vital as the speed with which we re-won possession.

Patience is a virtue, I think

That first goal for Real Salt Lake was one which seemed it would never come. Columbus Crew were resolute in their defending and more than content to let us keep the ball, and but for a deflection, they would have gone into the half having not conceded. What the first half saw, then, was two sides demonstrating immense patience: RSL continued their attack without panicking, and Crew continued their defense without wavering.

And by and large, there was something nice about that — perhaps because Real Salt Lake had breached the defense once, it was made more palatable. But once the Crew decided that, should they desire any result at all, they'd have to be at least slightly more adventurous. The second goal came perhaps as a result, more or less, of that: It was not so much that they had pushed too far forward, but that they failed to track any sort of run. It was as static as the Crew could have looked.

Constant movement

For a team playing — again — its third game in an eight-day stretch, it was encouraging to see those who played full matches in the two preceding matches — Tony Beltran, Nat Borchers, Ned Grabavoy, and Javier Morales, with Chris Wingert close behind — making constant attacking runs. The players who came in looked not just fresh, but eager to be involved. That sort of attitude is difficult to teach and is surely a testament to the squad that has been built.

That movement led to dangerous opportunities throughout the first half, and when the second half rolled around, it led to a further three goals for the home side. Running out winners has rarely been so literal a phrase. A special word should be reserved for Olmes Garcia and Devon Sandoval, who formed a strong, solid partnership, with both players making those essential runs. 

regular contributor to RealSaltLake.com, Matt Montgomery runs the SB Nation blog RSL Soapbox. Follow Matt on Twitter @TheCrossbarRSL

26 August 12:26 pm

Rimando to Beltran; Beltran to Findley; Findley to Velasquez; Velasquez to Beckerman; Beckerman to Velasquez; Velasquez to Wingert; Wingert to Grabavoy; Grabavoy to Morales; Morales to Gil; Gil to Grabavoy; Grabavoy to Morales; Morales to Velasquez; Velasquez to Grabavoy; Grabavoy to Gil.

Gil to goal.

Real Salt Lake’s third goal in its 4-0 romp over Columbus on Saturday night was an absolute beauty. Finishing off a 14-pass sequence that began with ‘keeper Nick Rimando and went through nine of the Claret-and-Cobalt’s 11 players, the move was a master-class in attacking soccer, featuring quick, one-two passing, heady dribbling and an excellent finish from Luis Gil.

Check out the entire 36-second sequence above.